2019 - 2021 Annual Incidents
CY 2019 CY 2020 CY 2021
January 334 348 342
February 345 313 313
March 325 272 343
April 306 255 356
May 349 299 332
June 367 274 397
July 332 314 408
August 360 368 406
September 371 291 373
October 400 324 433
November 331 340 414
December 362 311 463
4182 3709 4580

2020 -2022 Annual Incidents
2020 2021 2022
January 348 342 391
February 313 313 319
March 272 343 370
April 255 356 358
May 299 332
June 274 397
July 314 408
August 368 406
September 291 373
October 324 433
November 340 414
December 311 463
Totals 3709 4580 1438

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Please Follow the National Weather Service Red Flag Warnings
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By Member Jim Keener
March 28, 2022

A “Red Flag Warning” is a forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service in the United States to inform the public, firefighters, and land management agencies that conditions are ideal for wildland fire combustion, and rapid spread. After drought conditions, when humidity is very low, and especially when there are high or erratic winds which may include lightning as a factor, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies. These agencies often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk. To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours.

The weather criteria for fire weather watches and red flag warnings vary with each Weather Service office’s warning area based on the local vegetation type, topography, and distance from major water sources. They usually include the daily vegetation moisture content calculations, expected afternoon high temperature, afternoon minimum relative humidity and daytime wind speed.

To help prevent fires, follow these steps:

-Do not throw cigarettes or matches out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road and become a wildfire.

-Extinguish all outdoor fires properly. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it.

-Never leave a fire unattended. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass, ignite a fire, and quickly spread.


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