2019 - 2021 Annual Incidents
CY 2019 CY 2020 CY 2021
January 334 348 342
February 345 313 313
March 325 272 343
April 306 255 356
May 349 299 332
June 367 274 397
July 332 314 408
August 360 368 406
September 371 291 373
October 400 324 433
November 331 340 414
December 362 311 463
4182 3709 4580

2020 -2022 Annual Incidents
2020 2021 2022
January 348 342 391
February 313 313 319
March 272 343 370
April 255 356 358
May 299 332 375
June 274 397 403
July 314 408 350
August 368 406 375
September 291 373 377
October 324 433 383
November 340 414 371
December 311 463 377
Totals 3709 4580 4449

Web Counters
Website Visitors
Since
January 1, 2014
678,868
Visitors Today
Jan 28, 2023
50
Christmas Trees Present Potential Fire Hazards—Enjoy Them with Care and Caution
Email Print RSS Facebook Twitter RSS

By BY SUSAN MCKELVEY
December 7, 2022

For all the joy and beauty Christmas trees bring, it’s important to remember that they are large combustible items that present potential fire hazards in the home. Fire departments responded to an annual average of 160 home structure fires caused by Christmas trees between 2016 and 2020, resulting in two civilian deaths, 11 civilian injuries, and $12 million in direct property damage.

Statistically, Christmas tree fires don’t happen often, but when they do, they’re much more likely to be serious. The deadly fire that occurred at a row house in Philadelphia this past January, which involved a Christmas tree and caused 12 fatalities (nine of them children), tragically underscores this point.

Fires involving fresh Christmas trees tend to be more common than artificial tree fires. That’s in part because fresh Christmas trees dry out over time, making them more flammable the longer they’re in the home; a dried-out Christmas tree will burn much more quickly than a well-watered one.

Our Christmas tree safety tip sheet offers tips and recommendations for safely enjoying Christmas trees this season. Following are some key reminders:

* For a fresh tree, cut 2 inches (5 cm) from the base of the trunk before placing it in the stand. Add water daily to keep the tree well
hydrated.
* Trees should be placed at least 3 feet (1 m) away from any heat source, such as fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents, or lights.
* Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit, such as a door or window.
* Ensure that decorative lights are in good working order and used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Also, the latest statistics from NFPA on Christmas tree fires in US homes include these key findings, reflecting annual averages between 2016 and 2020:

* Christmas tree fires are more common between 3 p.m. and midnight, accounting for one-half of associated fires. Another 26 percent of
fires occurred between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
* Approximately two of every five home Christmas tree fires started in the living room, family room, or den.
* Electrical failures or malfunctions were factors in more than one-third (34 percent) of Christmas tree fires.
* In one-fifth (20 percent) of Christmas tree fires, some type of heat source was placed too close to the tree.

Visit our winter holidays page for additional information and resources on how to safely deck the halls this holiday season. These
resources can be shared online, through social media, and/or as handouts.

TOPICS: Public Education

Hyperlinks: Christmas Tree Safety List
Winter Holiday Safety Tips
 

Add a Comment Add a Comment 0 Comment(s)


Website Designed and Hosted By: Content Proudly Maintained By: Contact Info:
Firehouse Solutions
www.FirehouseSolutions.com
Bourbonnais Fire Protection District
1080 Armour Road
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914
Emergency Dial 911
Non-Emergency: 815-935-9670
E-mail: info@bourbonnaisfire.org
Copyright © 2023 Firehouse Solutions (A Service of Technology Reflections, Inc.)